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FIRE PREVENTION & SAFETY
 
Safety Tips

911 IS A VALUABLE TOOL DURING AN EMERGENCY PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO USE IT. Most Important never call from inside a burning house EXIT THE HOUSE THEN CALL!!

Only you can help Prevent Forest Fires Please do not discard lit items from your vehicle while driving.

Always sleep with your bedroom door closed.

If you become trapped in your room put a towel or blanket against the bottom of the door; Place a blanket or some other piece of clothing visibly out the window & make a lot of noise so we know where you are and that we need to rescue you.

Stop Drop & Roll this is what you should do if your clothes are on fire, always remember to cover your face.

Never bury an extension cord under a carpeting, the insulation could wear-off causing a fire.

Before using a Fire Place or Wood Stove make sure the Chimmney is professionally cleaned.

Flammable products should not be with in a childs reach keep all matches, lighters and flammable products lockup and away from the child.

Remind children never to remove batteries from the detectors, it could be a matter of life and death.

Smoke Alarms

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside sleeping areas.
  • Smoke Alarms should be replaced every 8-10 years.
  • Remember when you change your clock for Day Light Savings Time; you should change your batteries in your smoke detector.
  • Some smoke alarms are considered to be "hard-wired." This means they are connected to the household electrical system and may or may not have battery backup. If your smoke alarms are hard wired you will need to have a qualified electrician do the initial installation or install replacements. 

Carbon Monoxide

  • Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

  • CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.

  • Install at least one UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listed carbon monoxide alarm with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms.
  • Carbon Monoxide Alarms should be replaced every 5 years
  • Remember when you change your clock for Day Light Savings Time; you should change your batteries in your carbon monoxide detector
  • WHEN YOUR CARBON MONOXIDE ALARM IS SOUNDING PLEASE EXIT THE HOUSE AND DO NOT OPEN THE WINDOWS, WE ARE UNABLE TO TELL IF THERE IS CARBON MONOXIDE PRESENT

Wildfires

Plan ahead, protect your home before a Wildfire

Create a 30- to 100-foot safety zone around your home

  • Rake leaves, dead limbs and twigs. Clear all flammable vegetation.
  • Remove leaves and rubbish from under structures.
  • Thin a 15-foot space between tree crowns, and remove limbs within 15 feet of the ground.
  • Remove dead branches that extend over the roof.
  • Prune tree branches and shrubs within 15 feet of a stovepipe or chimney outlet.
  • Ask the power company to clear branches from powerlines.
  • Remove vines from the walls of the home.
  • Mow grass regularly.
  • Clear a 10-foot area around propane tanks and the barbecue. Place a screen over the grill – use nonflammable material with mesh no coarser than one-quarter inch.
  • Regularly dispose of newspapers and rubbish at an approved site. Follow local burning regulations.
  • Place stove, fireplace and grill ashes in a metal bucket, soak in water for 2 days; then bury the cold ashes in mineral soil.
  • Store gasoline, oily rags and other flammable materials in approved safety cans. Place cans in a safe location away from the base of buildings.
  • Stack firewood at least 100 feet away and uphill from your home. Clear combustible material within 20 feet. Use only UL-listed wood-burning devices.
  • Review your homeowner's insurance policy and also prepare/update a list of your home's contents.
  • Regularly clean roof and gutters.

 

Kitchen Safety

Protect Children from Scalds and Burns

  • Young children are at high risk of being burned by hot food and liquids. Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a "kid-free zone" of 3 feet (1 meter) around the stove.
  • To prevent spills due to overturn of appliances containing hot food or liquids, use the back burner when possible and/or turn pot handles away from the stove's edge.
  • Keep young children at least 3 feet (1 meter) away from any place where hot food or drink is being prepared or carried. Keep hot foods and liquids away from table and counter edges.
  • Never hold a child while cooking, drinking, or carrying hot foods or liquids.
  • Teach children that hot things burn.
  • When children are old enough, teach them to cook safely. Supervise them closely.

Kitchen Fires

  • The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking.
  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you're cooking.
  • Stay alert! To prevent cooking fires, you have to be alert. You won't be if you are sleepy, have been drinking alcohol, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy Keep anything that can catch fire - potholders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, towels, or curtains - away from your stovetop.
  • Keep the stovetop, burners, and oven clean.
  • Keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto the burner.
  • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and catch fire if it comes into contact with a gas flame or electric burner

 

 

 

E.D.I.T.H (Exit Drills in the Home)

MAKE A PLAN

  • Draw a basic floor plan of your house
  • Make two ways out of every room, and decide on the best escape routes.
  • Choose a meeting place that is a safe distance and everyone will remember. Preferably in front of your home-and tell everyone to meet there after they’ve escaped, so you can count heads and tell firefighters in anybody’s trapped inside. (EX: Mail Box, Tree or Neighbors House)

 

PRACTICE IT

  • Hold home fire drills. Practice your escape plan at least twice a year. 
  • Always practice like it is a real emergency by staying low and feeling doors before opening them. Pretend that some exits are blocked by smoke or fire and practice using alternative escape routes.

 

 

 

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